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Thread: Automatic chain oiler

  1. #1
    Baby Twin Shrike's Avatar
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    Automatic chain oiler

    Hey guys i just bought 15/42 T sprockets and a fancy chain for my 2007 tuono, anyone use an automatic chain oiler? I was thinking of getting a tutoro instead of a scot oiler but any opinions and reviews would be helpful!

  2. #2
    Baby Twin ldeijkva's Avatar
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    I installed a Scottoiler on a Gen2 Tuono last week. Had one on a Gen1 in the past. I'm very happy with the result. Proper build quality and many different materials included for installation. How to install the reservoir and route the tubing is up to you, they don't supply all the details (only ho to connect it to the vacuum and some best practices for using the reservoir). On my previous Tuono the Scottoiler basically eliminated maintenance and significantly increased the lifespan. You do need to tweak the oil flow a bit during the first weeks. If you search for customer reviews you'll read a lot of complaints regarding oily and greasy swingarms, rims and tires.

    I'm a very happy customer, recommend a unit to everyone!
    Thanks from Shrike

  3. #3
    One Litre Duc Eater
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    I have a auto spray tin for mine , put my finger on can and it automatically sprays lube onto chain !

  4. #4
    Baby Twin Shrike's Avatar
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    I installed a Tutoro, will let you guys know how it goes over the next few months

  5. #5
    One Litre Duc Eater Paul D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldeijkva View Post
    I installed a Scottoiler on a Gen2 Tuono last week. Had one on a Gen1 in the past. I'm very happy with the result.

    I'm a very happy customer, recommend a unit to everyone!
    Ide...

    Did you use a single injector Scotoiler, or dual?
    - If dual, how did you fix it to the curved swingarm?

    Any photos?

    I installed a single injector unit, but one side of the chain rings much dryer... so not ideal in my view... but it still cuts down on regular manual chain lubes, so better than none.

  6. #6
    Evil Twin Daz1966's Avatar
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    I'm running with the single injector too, ditto the request for any info on fitting a dual injector.

  7. #7
    GP Champ
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    I don't really see the point of chain oilers .

    chains need to be cleaned as well as lubed , a spray wash with wd 40 or similar dry it off and re wax with good quality chain wax .
    I always get good mileage from my chains , buy a decent chain and look after it .

    surely a chain oiler will just keep the chain wet, and all sorts of shite will attach itself and grind the chain to pieces .

    just my opinion !!!!

  8. #8
    Superbike Twin 999Gav's Avatar
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    Plus they make a mess of ones wheelie pivot

  9. #9
    Baby Twin ldeijkva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul D View Post
    Ide...

    Did you use a single injector Scotoiler, or dual?
    - If dual, how did you fix it to the curved swingarm?

    Any photos?

    I installed a single injector unit, but one side of the chain rings much dryer... so not ideal in my view... but it still cuts down on regular manual chain lubes, so better than none.
    I also used the single injector unit. The chain probably is dryer on the inner side, but I can't really spot the difference. Looks lubed just about right. I don't think you could fit the dual injector on the RSV/Tuono swingarm, at least not with the standard mounting parts. Maybe the dual injector is packaged with different mounting parts?

    Quote Originally Posted by hilift View Post
    I don't really see the point of chain oilers .

    chains need to be cleaned as well as lubed , a spray wash with wd 40 or similar dry it off and re wax with good quality chain wax .
    I always get good mileage from my chains , buy a decent chain and look after it .

    surely a chain oiler will just keep the chain wet, and all sorts of shite will attach itself and grind the chain to pieces .

    just my opinion !!!!
    That was initially also my opinion, I could not see the logic/advantage in similar systems compared to cleaning/lubing the chain manually. A mate explained that by lubing the chain from the inside and the centrifugic force (pardon my English, I'm struggling here...) pushes out dirt which in turn don't get a chance to deteriorate the chain links. After reading into the product I found similar reviews/statements from other users. After installing my first unit a couple of years ago and using the system for a few weeks I noticed that the chain kept much cleaner, dirt basically gets flinged off.
    Thanks from lucas60

  10. #10
    One Litre Duc Eater Paul D's Avatar
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    Ide,

    Re. Twin injector:
    I fitted one to my previous bike (a SV650). It's only designed for flat swing arms, and doesn't come with fitments for a curved unit. I spoke to Scotoiler helpline which is very good. They suggested users could fabricate a packing block, which I agree is possible if someone has the time and tools.

    Re. Virtue of a chain oiler.

    I totally agree. Scottoilers are designed to flow lighter oil onto the chain and wash dirt off. Chain grease, on the other hand, is designed to catch grit and turn into a grinding paste! Any bike with one set up properly should have a very clean chain, which many testify, will last much longer than one which has the hassle of being cleaned every few weeks.

    That said, a periodic clean is still worth while, but even that is easier, and only requires running the chain through a rag with some Scottoil on it.

    True, their is some fling of the lighter oil. But I have black wheels so not very noticeable, and if drop rate is set right fling is minimal.

    But each to their own. There are certainly pros & cons...

  11. #11
    Baby Twin Shrike's Avatar
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    I fitted my tutoro so that its under the rear seat and drips oil onto my chain just behind the front sprocket.
    Seems to be working well but im still adjusting the flow of the lube

  12. #12
    One Litre Duc Eater Paul D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shrike View Post
    I fitted my tutoro so that its under the rear seat and drips oil onto my chain just behind the front sprocket.
    Seems to be working well but im still adjusting the flow of the lube
    Drips oil onto front sprocket! Is that what Tutoro advise? Scotoiler advise against that because centrifugal force then just throws the oil off again. The recommended approach is normally to drip onto lower chain at approx the 6:30 or 7:35pm point of the rear socket. Then centrifugal force will run the oil out onto the chain.

    PS: Hadn't heard of Tutoro before. Are they a foreign company who ripped off a good British design (I.e. Scotoiler!)?

  13. #13
    Baby Twin Shrike's Avatar
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    Not sure who tutoro are but they were recommended by a friend, same price as scott oiler except the kit has more parts for getting it set up correct, yes they do not recommend it but with the tuonos weird shaped swing arm and chain guard it will do for now!

  14. #14
    One Litre Duc Eater Paul D's Avatar
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    Interesting, thanks. Apparently they are a UK company that manufacture products in Gloucester. They claim their chain oilers don't use the bikes electrical or vacuum systems to operate.

    Are Tutoros just gravity fed?
    - In which case, what stops them leaking lots of oil when stationary and also when engine off?

    Presumably they don't! So just wondering how they work...

  15. #15
    Baby Twin ldeijkva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul D View Post
    Interesting, thanks. Apparently they are a UK company that manufacture products in Gloucester. They claim their chain oilers don't use the bikes electrical or vacuum systems to operate.

    Are Tutoros just gravity fed?
    - In which case, what stops them leaking lots of oil when stationary and also when engine off?

    Presumably they don't! So just wondering how they work...
    Tutoro's are gravity fed. Oil flows when the bike is in motion, when it's sitting stationary the valve is closed. Theoretically this eliminates the problem that Scottoiler's have. In daily use though I do not notice excess oil from my Scottoiler when running stationary. It's not like you are sitting in front of stopping lights hours a day.

  16. #16
    One Litre Duc Eater Paul D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldeijkva View Post
    Tutoro's are gravity fed. Oil flows when the bike is in motion, when it's sitting stationary the valve is closed.
    So, there must be some kind of motion detecting valve!
    Any idea how that works without any wires connected to the bikes system? A ball bearing in an oil filled bath with a slightly tapered base... might work, I guess..!

  17. #17
    Baby Twin
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    hi everyone, I have had scottoilers on all my chain driven bikes and once you have taken the time to set them up properly they are faultless. I am about to order one for my tuono,but emailed scottoiler for advice as they suggested running the delivery to the front sprocket on my Ducati (single sided swinging arm) So I asked their advice because of the banana shaped swinging arm. Was advised ok to run to the front sprocket which would make a neater job. I had no probs doing this on my Ducati so likeley to do the same on my tuono regards to,all Lou

  18. #18
    Baby Twin
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    Well I have now fitted a new Scott oiler to my 2006 gen 1 Tuono Factoru
    I routed the drip feed to the front sprocket with advice from Shaun at scottoiler
    and it is working fine. I initially routed the feed inside the front
    sprocket cover but then decided to return/ route outside
    bringing the feed into the front sprocket from the
    outside as their was very little space on the inside
    of the sprocket cover I hope this helps someone?
    I would post pics but having probs so if someone
    wasn’t pics send me an email address and I’ll
    Post pics to you. Regards lucas60

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